How do you punctuate a quote at the end of a sentence?


30 Second Answer

The rule in the United States is that periods and commas must always be within the quotation marks. Colons and semicolons (dashes also) can go outside.

In the United States, the rule of thumb is that commas and periods always go inside the quotation marks, and colons and semicolons (dashes as well) go outside: “There was a storm last night,” Paul said. The reason for this is that these punctuation marks are considered to be part of the sentence, rather than part of the quote.

However, there are some alternative opinions on this matter. Some people believe that commas and periods should always go outside the quotation marks, regardless of whether they are part of the sentence or not. Others believe that it depends on the context of the quote. For example, if the quote is interrupted by another piece of punctuation, then it might look better to have the comma or period outside the quotation marks.

Ultimately, it is up to the writer to decide which punctuation style to use. There are no hard and fast rules, so it is important to choose whichever style looks best in each individual case.

Do you put a period after a quote that ends in a question mark?

No, you do not put a period after a quote that ends in a question mark.

Do you put a period after a quote that ends in a question mark?

The general rule of thumb is that if the quotation is a complete sentence on its own, then you do not need to add an additional period. This is because the question mark or exclamation point already signifies the end of the sentence. For example:

She asked, “Will you be my friend?”
He exclaimed, “I can’t believe it!”

In these cases, adding an extra period would be superfluous and actually changing the meaning of the quotation. However, if the quotation is not a complete sentence on its own, then you will need to add a period:

She asked me, “Will you be my friend?”
He exclaimed, “I can’t believe it!”

The reason for this is that in the first instance, the quotation is functioning as its own sentence. In the second instance, however, it is not. Adding the period in this case serves to indicate that what follows is not part of the quotation.

There are some exceptions to this rule. For example, if you are quoting multiple paragraphs and one of them ends with a question mark or exclamation point, then you would need to add a period after that particular paragraph but not after the others:

She said:
“I don’t know what to do.
Should I stay or should I go?”

In this case, because each paragraph is its own unit within the larger quotation, they each need to end with a period (even though one of them contains a question mark). However, if each paragraph was only one sentence long, then you would not need to add any extra periods.

Ultimately, whether or not you include a period after a quote that ends in a question mark depends on whether or not the quotation functions as its own sentence. If it does, then no extra period is necessary. If it doesn’t, then you will need to add one.

How do you end a sentence?

You have three options when punctuating the end of a sentence: a period, an exclamation mark, or a question mark.

When it comes to punctuating the end of a sentence, you have three options: a period, an exclamation mark, or a question mark. Each one sets a different tone for the whole sentence: that of a statement, an outcry, or a question, respectively.

Why this is the case has to do with the function of each punctuation mark. A period indicates that the sentence is over and done with; an exclamation mark adds emphasis to a statement or shows excitement; and a question mark indicates that, well, a question is being asked.

Here are some examples:

Statement: I’m going to the store.
Outcry: I can’t believe you did that!
Question: Are you coming with me?

As you can see, each punctuation mark changes the tone of the sentence. So when you’re choosing which one to use, think about the effect you want to achieve.

There are also instances when alternative opinions on punctuation exist. For example, some people believe that exclamation marks are overused and should be used sparingly, if at all. Others believe that they can be helpful in conveying emotion in writing. Ultimately, it’s up to you to decide what you think sounds best.

When it comes to ending sentences, there are three main options: a period, an exclamation mark, or a question mark. Each one sets a different tone for the whole sentence. Keep this in mind when choosing which punctuation mark to use in order to create the desired effect in your writing.

How do you punctuate a sentence that ends with a quoted question?

The question mark (inside the closing quotation mark) ends the sentence; no additional period is needed.

It is generally accepted that a sentence that ends with a quoted question should have the question mark inside the closing quotation mark. This rule is in place because the question mark signifies the end of the sentence, regardless of whether or not it is part of the quote. For example, if someone were to say “Why me?” without quoting anyone, it would be clear that they are asking a question and that the sentence is finished. However, if they were to say “She kept asking, “Why me?””, it would not be as clear that the sentence is finished, as the person could be quoting someone else who was asking a question. In this case, it is generally accepted that putting the question mark inside the closing quotation mark makes it clear that the sentence is finished.

There are some cases where people may disagree with this rule. For example, if someone were to say “Did you just ask, “Why me?””, it could be argued that the person is asking a question and that the quoted portion is not part of the original sentence. In this case, some people may put a period after “Why me?” and add another question mark at the end of the sentence. However, most people would still follow the rule and put the question mark inside the closing quotation mark, as this makes it clear that the person is quoting someone else and that they are not asking a question themselves.

Overall, it is generally accepted that a sentence that ends with a quoted question should have the question mark inside the closing quotation mark. This rule is in place because it makes it clear when a sentence is finished and avoids confusion about whether or not someone is actually asking a question.

When you end a sentence with a quote where does the period go?

The period typically goes before the closing quotation mark when ending a sentence, in order to improve the appearance of the text.

When a comma or period is needed after a quotation, publishers in the United States typically put the punctuation mark before the closing quotation mark. The reason for this convention is that it improves the appearance of the text.

For example, consider the following sentence:

The poet John Keats once wrote, “A thing of beauty is a joy forever.”

If the comma were placed after the closing quotation mark, it would look like this:

The poet John Keats once wrote, “A thing of beauty is a joy forever”,.

The sentence looks better when the comma is placed before the closing quotation mark:

The poet John Keats once wrote, “A thing of beauty is a joy forever.”

How do you end a sentence with a quote?

“There was a storm last night,” Paul said.

In the United States, the rule of thumb is that commas and periods always go inside the quotation marks. This is because these punctuation marks indicate the end of a sentence, and so they should be placed within the quotation marks to show that the sentence is ended. However, colons and semicolons go outside the quotation marks. This is because these punctuation marks do not indicate the end of a sentence, and so they should be placed outside the quotation marks.

There are some exceptions to this rule. For example, if the quoted material is followed by a parenthetical citation, the period should be placed outside the quotation marks. Also, if you are quoting material that already includes a period within the quotation marks, you do not need to add another period.

There are also alternative opinions on where to place punctuation marks in relation to quotation marks. In Britain, for example, it is more common to place commas and periods outside the quotation marks. This is because in British English, punctuation marks are not always used to indicate the end of a sentence. So, if a sentence ends with a quoted piece of material, it is more common to place the period outside the quotation marks, to show that the quoted material is not part of the sentence.

Ultimately, it is up to you as the writer to decide where to place punctuation marks in relation to quotation marks. Just be consistent throughout your writing.

Codie Gulzar

Codie Gulzar is a writer for R4DN, a blog with a wealth of information on all things data-related. He is also an experienced data analyst and has worked in the field for several years. When he's not writing or crunching numbers, Codie enjoys spending time with his wife and two young children.

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