How do you cite a quote within a quote APA 7th edition?


30 Second Answer

Citing a quote within a quote is as simple as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. Mention the last name of the original author, include the date of publication, add “as cited in” to the name of the work, and follow with the publication date of the cited work.

It is easy to cite a quote within an existing quote. Mention the last name of the original author and include the date of publication. Then, add “as cited in” to the name of the work. Follow the publication date of the cited work and input the URL of the page where the information is located.

This is important because it allows readers to track down the source of the original quote easily. It also provides context for readers who may not be familiar with the work that is being referenced.

There are a few different ways to format this type of citation, so be sure to check with your professor or editor to see which style they prefer.

Do you have any tips for citing quotes within quotes? Share them in the comments below!

How do you quote a quote within a quote within a quote?

He answered, “I was told, ‘Keep the document marked “Secret” in a safe place.”

When quoting a quote within a quote, you should enclose it in double quotation marks. This is because the main quotation is already in double quotation marks. He answered, “I was told, ‘Keep the document marked “Secret” in a safe place.”

How do you quote a quote within a legal quote?

According to the MLA Style Guide, when quoting a quote within a legal quote, the internal quotation marks should be omitted if the opening and closing quotation marks of the original quoted material appear at the beginning and end of the new quotation.

When quoting a quote, it is best to omit the internal quotation marks if the opening and closing quotation marks of the original quoted material appear at the beginning and end of the new quotation. This is the case because a “quoting” parenthetical must be appended. (R10. 6.2; R1.5.2(f)(i))

The reason for this is that the opening and closing quotation marks of the original quoted material signal that the material within them is a quotation. Adding internal quotation marks would be redundant and could potentially confuse readers. However, if omitting the internal quotation marks would create ambiguity, then they should be retained.

Here is an example:

Original Quote: “I’m not going,” she said.
New Quote: She said she wasn’t “going.”
In this case, omitting the internal quotation marks makes it clear that “going” is being quoted since the opening and closing quotation marks of the original quote are still present.

On the other hand, consider this example:

Original Quote: He said, “I’m not going.”
New Quote: He said he wasn’t going.
In this case, omitting the internal quotation marks could create ambiguity since readers might not know whether “going” is being quoted or not. In cases like this, it is best to retain the internal quotation marks.

How do you cite a quote within a quote in Bluebook?

If the quotation’s opening and closing quotation marks are at the end or beginning of the new quote, it is best to omit them.

If you’re quoting material that itself includes a quotation, you may omit the internal quotation marks from the original quoted material. For example, if you’re quoting a character from a play who says, “I can’t believe she said, ‘I don’t love you,'” you would write:

The character exclaimed, “I can’t believe she said, ‘I don’t love you'” (Smith 1.2.56-57).

In this case, the omission of internal quotation marks is due to the fact that the original quote already includes them. Additionally, a “quoting” parenthetical must be appended to show that the material is being quoted within a larger work.

How do you quote something already in quotes APA?

When you’re quoting someone who is themselves quoting someone else, you use single quotation marks to enclose the inner quote. This is the case because you’re already using double quotation marks to enclose the outer quote. An example of this would be if you were to say “The reporter told me, ‘When I interviewed the quarterback, he said they simply ‘played a better game.'” In this instance, the inner quote would be enclosed in single quotation marks.

There may be instances where you want to use an alternative opinion. In this case, you would use double quotation marks for both the outer and inner quotes. An example of this would be if you were to say “The reporter told me, “When I interviewed the quarterback, he said they simply ‘played a better game.'” In this instance, both quotes would be enclosed in double quotation marks.

Keep in mind that when using quotations within quotations, it’s important to be clear about which person is speaking. You can do this by using pronouns or by attributing the quote to a specific person. For example, you could say “The reporter told me that the quarterback said they played a better game.” In this instance, it’s clear that the reporter is the one speaking. Alternatively, you could say “The reporter told me that when he interviewed the quarterback, the quarterback said they played a better game.” In this instance, it’s clear that the quarterback is the one speaking.

Finally, it’s important to note that there are different conventions for quoting material in different styles (e.g., MLA, APA). Be sure to consult your style guide for specific guidance on how to format quotes within quotes.

How do you address a quote within a quote?

Use single quotation marks to enclose quotes within another quotation.

When you’re quoting someone who’s already quoting someone else, you use single quotation marks around the inner quotation. Here’s an example:

The reporter told me, “When I interviewed the quarterback, he said they simply ‘played a better game.'”

According to the reporter, “When I interviewed the quarterback, he said they simply ‘played a better game.'”

In this case, the inner quotation is “played a better game.”

Why is this the case?

The reason you use single quotation marks for quotations within quotations is because double quotation marks are already being used for the overall quotation. If you used double quotation marks around the inner quotation, it would be confusing.

Here’s an example of what that would look like:

The reporter told me, “When I interviewed the quarterback, he said they simply “played a better game.””

As you can see, this looks confusing because it’s not clear which part of the sentence is being quoted. Is it just “played a better game,” or is the whole sentence being quoted?

To avoid this confusion, writers use single quotation marks for quotations within quotations.

Are there any alternative opinions on this?

Some style guides suggest using single quotation marks even when you’re not quoting someone else. They argue that it makes quotations easier to spot because they’re set off by a different type of punctuation mark.

However, most style guides (including APA and MLA) recommend using double quotation marks unless there’s a reason to do otherwise.

final thoughts

In conclusion, it is generally agreed upon that using single quotation marks for quotations within quotations is the best way to avoid confusion. However, there are some style guides that suggest using single quotation marks all the time in order to make quotations easier to spot.

Codie Gulzar

Codie Gulzar is a writer for R4DN, a blog with a wealth of information on all things data-related. He is also an experienced data analyst and has worked in the field for several years. When he's not writing or crunching numbers, Codie enjoys spending time with his wife and two young children.

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